Être and Avoir (to be and to have) are the two most used, and hence most important verbs in the French language.

They have one particularity which differentiates them from all the other French verbs. They can be used in two different ways: 1: just like any other verbs, and 2: as auxiliaries.

 

1) Être and Avoir: verbs like all the others

The verbs être and avoir can on the one hand be used as any other verbs, with their own meaning and construction.

Être is sometimes used in the sense of existing:

Que la lumière soit, et la lumière fut

Let there be light, and there was light

Être is most often used to introduce an attribute:

La fille est belle > The girl is beautiful

Nicolas est journaliste > Nicolas is a journalist

Mon père est le directeur de cette école > My father is the executive of this school

 

Avoir is used with an object, and indicates that the subject of the sentence “possess” this “object”.

J’ai deux livres dans mon sac > I have two books in my bag

 

2) Être and Avoir used as auxiliaries

Regardless of this ordinary use, être and avoir are also used as auxiliary verbs, meaning they’re used to constitute certain forms of the conjugation of the other verbs. There are 3 possibilities:

  • Compound tenses:

All the verbs in the compound tenses (passé composé, plus-que-parfait, passé antérieur…) are constituted with the auxiliaries être or avoir followed by the past participle of the verb.

J’ai mangé le gâteau > I ate the cake

Je suis sorti de la maison > I went out of the house

  • Passive voice:

The passive voice is when the action described by the verb is being done to the subject by an agent (usually introduced by the preposition “par”, by, but not always). It’s formed with the auxiliary être + the past participle of the verb.

La souris est mangée par le chat > The mouse is eaten by the cat

  • Compound tenses in the passive voice:

It’s the passive voice in the past. You use the two auxiliaries: être for the passive part, and avoir for the compound part (a été + past participle)

Le gnou a été mangé par le crocodile > The wildebeest was eaten by the crocodile

 

The use of Être for compound tenses.

  • Être is the auxiliary of the verbs that mark a movement or a change of state which comes to completion. Hence, verbs like aller, to go ; arriver, to arrive ; devenir, to become ; entrer, to enter, mourir, to die… are all used with être.

Il est allé en Angleterre et il est devenu célèbre > He went to England and he became famous

  • Être is also the auxiliary of reflexive verbs.

Il s’est battu, puis il s’est blessé > He fought, then he hurt himself

 

The use of Avoir for compound tenses.

Avoir is the auxiliary of all the verbs that don’t use être.

The verb être uses the auxiliary avoir:

Il a été président de la République > He was the President of the Republic

The verb avoir uses itself as an auxiliary:

Elle a eu un jeu vidéo pour son anniversaire  > She had a video game for her birthday

 

The verb Être: the most frequent verb in French.

As an auxiliary, the verb avoir is more frequently used than être. However, the uses of être as an ordinary verb (not auxiliary) are much more frequent than those of avoir. As a result, it’s the verb être which is the most frequent verb of the French language, just before avoir.

 

3) Être and Avoir’s conjugation

Conjugation of Être

Indicative mood

Present / Présent

je suis
tu es
il est
nous sommes
vous êtes
ils sont

Present Perfect / Passé composé

j’ai été
tu as été
il a été
nous avons été
vous avez été
ils ont été

 

Imperfect / Imparfait

j’étais
tu étais
il était
nous étions
vous étiez
ils étaient
 

Pluperfect / Plus-que-parfait

j’avais été
tu avais été
il avait été
nous avions été
vous aviez été
ils avaient été
 

Future / Futur

je serai
tu seras
il sera
nous serons
vous serez
ils seront
 

Future perfect / Futur antérieur

j’aurai été
tu auras été
il aura été
nous aurons été
vous aurez été
ils auront été
 

Simpe Past / Passé simple

je fus
tu fus
il fut
nous fûmes
vous fûtes
ils furent
 

Past Anterior / Passé antérieur

j’eus été
tu eus été
il eut été
nous eûmes été
vous eûtes été
ils eurent été

Conditional mood

Present Conditional / Conditionnel Présent

je serais
tu serais
il serait
nous serions
vous seriez
ils seraient
 Past Conditional / Conditionnel Passé

j’aurais été
tu aurais été
il aurait été
nous aurions été
vous auriez été
ils auraient été

Subjunctive mood

Present Subjunctive / Subjonctif Présent

que je sois
que tu sois
qu’il soit
que nous soyons
que vous soyez
qu’ils soient

Past Subjunctive / Subjonctif Passé

que j’aie été
que tu aies été
qu’il ait été
que nous ayons été
que vous ayez été
qu’ils aient été

 

Imperfect Subjunctive / Subjonctif Imparfait

que je fusse
que tu fusses
qu’il fût
que nous fussions
que vous fussiez
qu’ils fussent

 

Pluperfect Subjunctive / Subjonctif Plus-que-parfait

que j’eusse été
que tu eusses été
qu’il eût été
que nous eussions été
que vous eussiez été
qu’ils eussent été

Imperative mood

Present Imperative / Impératif Présent

(tu) sois
(nous) soyons
(vous) soyez
Past Imperative / Impératif Passé

(tu) aie été
(nous) ayons été
(vous) ayez été

Infinitive mood

Present Infinitive / Infinitif Présent

être

Past infinitive / Infinitif Passé

avoir été

Participle mood

Present Participle / Participe Présent

étant

Past Participle / Participe Passé

été
ayant été

 

Formal vs. Modern Pronunciation of Être

Be careful with the pronunciation of être. In more formal French, some people make liaisons with certain forms of être, such as:

Je suis anglais > I am English

Ils sont arrivés > They have arrived

However, in informal modern French, most people make glidings:

Je suis > J’suis [shùi], without the liaison: J’suis anglais.

Tu es > T’es [té], without the liaison: T’es anglais

Il sera > Il s’ra, and this continues in the future and the conditional.

 

Conjugation of Avoir

Indicative mood

Present / Présent

j’ai
tu as
il a
nous avons
vous avez
ils ont
Present Perfect / Passé composé

j’ai eu
tu as eu
il a eu
nous avons eu
vous avez eu
ils ont eu
 

Imperfect / Imparfait

j’avais
tu avais
il avait
nous avions
vous aviez
ils avaient
 

Pluperfect / Plus-que-parfait

j’avais eu
tu avais eu
il avait eu
nous avions eu
vous aviez eu
ils avaient eu
 

Future / Futur

j’aurai
tu auras
il aura
nous aurons
vous aurez
ils auront
 

Future perfect / Futur antérieur

j’aurai eu
tu auras eu
il aura eu
nous aurons eu
vous aurez eu
ils auront eu
 

Simpe Past / Passé simple

j’eus
tu eus
il eut
nous eûmes
vous eûtes
ils eurent
 

Past Anterior / Passé antérieur

j’eus eu
tu eus eu
il eut eu
nous eûmes eu
vous eûtes eu
ils eurent eu

Conditional mood

Present Conditional / Conditionnel Présent

j’aurais
tu aurais
il aurait
nous aurions
vous auriez
ils auraient
 Past Conditional / Conditionnel Passé

j’aurais eu
tu aurais eu
il aurait eu
nous aurions eu
vous auriez eu
ils auraient eu

Subjunctive mood

Present Subjunctive / Subjonctif Présent

que j’aie
que tu aies
qu’il ait
que nous ayons
que vous ayez
qu’ils aient

Past Subjunctive / Subjonctif Passé

que j’aie eu
que tu aies eu
qu’il ait eu
que nous ayons eu
que vous ayez eu
qu’ils aient eu
 

Imperfect Subjunctive / Subjonctif Imparfait

que j’eusse
que tu eusses
qu’il eût
que nous eussions
que vous eussiez
qu’ils eussent

 

Pluperfect Subjunctive / Subjonctif Plus-que-parfait

que j’eusse eu
que tu eusses eu
qu’il eût eu
que nous eussions eu
que vous eussiez eu
qu’ils eussent eu

Imperative mood

Present Imperative / Impératif Présent

(tu) aie
(nous) ayons
(vous) ayez
Past Imperative / Impératif Passé

(tu) aie eu
(nous) ayons eu
(vous) ayez eu

Infinitive mood

Present Infinitive / Infinitif Présent

avoir

Past infinitive / Infinitif Passé

avoir eu

Participle mood

Present Participle / Participe Présent

ayant

Past Participle / Participe Passé

eu
ayant eu

 

Pronunciation of Avoir

avoir has many required liaisons with the subject pronouns:

Nous avons > We have

Vous avez une > You have

Ils/Elles ont > They have

Be careful not to confuse ils ont (they have), and ils sont (they are), which is a major mistake.

 

In informal modern French, people make a lot of glidings…

Tu as > T’as [ta] : T’as un chien ? > You have a dog?

…especially with the very common expression “il y a“, there is:

Il y a > [ya] : Il y a un avion > There’s an airplane

Il n’y a pas de > [yapad] : Il n’y a pas de problèmes > There’s no problem

Il y en a > [yã na] : Il y en a beaucoup > There’s a lot (of it)

 

Note also that the past participle of avoir:eu“, is pronounced [ù].